A Fox in the Raccoon House

Back in May, Steve and I were in the right place at the right time when a small baby gray fox came in to WildCare.

FoxIntake1

FoxIntake2

She had been found alone with an empty belly in a parking lot a few days earlier, and had spent a couple of days with a veterinarian before being transferred to us. All in all, she was in pretty good physical shape, and she was destined to be transferred to another rehab organization that has more experience raising fox kits. But she required a few days in quarantine before she could be transferred to the other rehabber who would merge her into an existing group of kits. 

Being in a cage at WildCare can have risks for distemper-prone species. Although we maintain quarantine, if another animal with distemper comes to the center, there is a risk, no matter how slight, of contagion. In addition, this was a depressed, high-stress little critter who didn’t need the worrying activity of people entering a Ward several times a day.

Long story short, since our foster care cage was currently unoccupied, we got to take her home!

 FoxInCage

 We had her from that Sunday to the following Saturday when we drove her up to another rehabber in Sonoma. We weighed her a few times during the week to be sure she was gaining weight (which she was – I make a damn fine omnivore diet and always raise healthy little bowling ball raccoons).

AnneWithFox2

SteveWithFox1

We don’t get very many foxes at WildCare, and they are usually adults – in our 7 and a half years at WildCare, this is the first kit Steve and I have seen – so this may well have been a once in a lifetime experience. Although, another fox kit made it to WildCare a couple of weeks ago, so maybe we’ll get another chance sometime. After all, we’re the new (self-dubbed) Fox Team Leaders.  : )

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