This Whole Damn Place is Magical, Then We Find Fairyland

This morning we headed to the Trotternish Peninsula (the northwest portion of Skye). We’d barely made it out of Portree before we encountered waterfalls and views of the Old Man of Storr.

waterfall

sheep landscape

Old Man of Storr landscape

Old Man of Storr landscape

It was mainly a day to drive around and stop for photos along the way, but we still managed to do a fair amount of walking, particularly when we stopped at the main parking area for the trailhead to the Old Man of Storr. It was a 2,200 foot elevation change from the parking lot to the Old Man, so we had decided earlier not to walk all the way up. However, we did walk a fair way up the hill on both the left and the right sides to get some views of the rock formation.

Old Man of Storr

path to the Old Man of Storr

Old Man of Storr

As I expected, the cloud hanging out in the valley between the Old Man and the rock face of The Storr started to clear out as soon as we were back in the car and driving down the highway, but we were able to get a great view from the road.

Storr and the Old Man

Steve with the Old Man of Storr

Anne with the Old Man of Storr

There were lots of scenic stops to make as we went.

along the coast

sheep along the coast

along the coast

Steve on the coast

Anne on the coast

Another lovely rock formation along the way was Kilt Rock, complete with Mealt Waterfall in the foreground flowing over the cliff and directly into the ocean.

Kilt Rock

Kilt Rock

Anne by Kilt Rock

Steve by Kilt Rock

We continued to drive along the coast, getting a few photos along the way of the Quiraing, a landslip on the eastern face of Meall na Suiramach, the northernmost summit of the Trotternish Ridge. I had originally thought we might take a hike along the ridge, but it wasn’t in the cards today, so I contented myself with a few photos from the road.

the Quiraing

the Quiraing

the Quiraing

We stopped at lovely little café in Kilmaluag for lunch. The Single Track Art Gallery & Espresso Bar was recommended to us by the librarian we met at Armadale yesterday, and he was absolutely right to do so. It is a very small café without the best signage, and we would have totally driven past it if we hadn’t known what to look for. It had been described as a grey angular building that looked a bit like a coffin. Seeing it from the road, we agreed this must be the place, so we pulled into the parking area.

Single Track Art Gallery & Espresso Bar

The café probably couldn’t hold more than 10 people at a time, but we had the BEST sandwich we’d had on the trip, and frankly, one of the best sandwiches I’ve ever had. Steve and I also shared a piece of Belgian chocolate cake with cardamom marzipan frosting, and I had a dark chocolate hot chocolate. It was all absolutely delicious. A highly recommended lunch spot, if you can find it.

Following lunch, we continued our drive along the coast to the ruins of Duntulm Castle, the 15th century Clan MacLeod, and later Clan Donald, castle that the librarian at Armadale had told us about yesterday.

ruins of Duntulm

ruins of Duntulm

ruins of Duntulm

ruins of Duntulm

Anne at ruins of Duntulm

Steve at ruins of Duntulm

Our final stop of the day was another Fairy Glen. This Fairy Glen seemed more aptly named than the one we visited in Rosemarkie. While the Rosemarkie glen was lovely, the glen just south of Uig looks like the kind of place fairies might live, with small, swirly hills, rising like fairy-sized mountain peaks.

Fairy Glen

Fairy Glen

Fairy Glen

Fairy Glen

Steve at Fairy Glen

Anne at Fairy Glen

We spent a bit of time walking around in the glen, taking photos of a series of waterfalls across the next valley.

waterfall at Fairy Glen

As the afternoon started to fade away, we drove back to Portree for our final night on Skye, enjoying a lovely equine sunset back at the B&B. After all, I did mention that I find horses outside the B&B to be quite charming.

sunset with horses